Archive for Job Hunting

“Civil Rights in the 21st Century”: University of California’s Upcoming Public Service Conference

The Place: On September 23rd and 24th, University of California will again host its inaugural Public Service Law Conference at UCLA’s Luskin Center.

The Event: “In partnership with the UC Office of the President, Continuing Education of the Bar (CEB), Berkeley School of Law, UCLA School of Law, UC Davis School of Law, and UC Irvine School of Law, the conference will bring together more than 500 law students, faculty members, lawyers, and nonprofit professionals committed to advancing civil rights and the public good. Panels and speeches will focus on the people, organizations, and systems working on the legal aspects of vital issues like immigration, homelessness, police accountability, water rights, and veterans’ issues during a day-and-a-half long conference.

Keynote Speakers and Panelists Include: Janet Napolitano, President of the University of California; Peter Neufeld, Co-Founder of the Innocence Project; Marielena Hincapie, Executive Director at the National Immigration Law Center; Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean at UC Berkeley School of Law; Jennifer Mnookin, Dean at UCLA School of Law; Kevin Johnson, Dean at UC Davis School of Law; L. Song Richardson, Interim Dean at UC Irvine School of Law; and more.

Registering: Individuals interested in attending the conference may register here. Registration is $150 and includes a lunch and evening reception on the first day with speakers and sponsors, breakfast on the second day, and all CLE costs (if applicable).”

Why We At PSJD Would Go: Due to University of California’s large network of schools and outreach within the state, the speakers at this event are among the best attorneys in the Public Sector and in their respective fields. Each is an expert on the topic they will be lecturing on and could potentially offer a plethora of insights into their specialties. In addition, the conference has particular workshops focused on furthering your own career in public service, including a panel entitled “How to Get a Job: Panel of Experts.” Plus, who doesn’t want a good excuse to soak up some Southern California sunshine?

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Job’o’th’Week (Experienced Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

Assistant/Associate Professor of Law

The Organization

The University of Oregon is a member of the Association of American Universities (AAU), and is a major research university committed to combining high level research with strong undergraduate and graduate teaching. Founded in 1876, UO enrolls almost 24,000 students from all 50 states and more than 95 countries; and offers over 300 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. There are also 30 research centers, institutes, and core research facilities. Since July 2014, the University has been governed by an independent Board of Trustees of the University of Oregon. One of two AAU institutions in the Pacific Northwest, the University is widely known for a mix of highly ranked departments and innovative interdisciplinary programs; a strong commitment to research and education; and a collaborative, non-hierarchical institutional culture.

The Position

Seeking an individual who has demonstrated academic excellence, demonstrated success or the potential for success in scholarship and teaching, and a JD from an accredited law school or its equivalent. Successful candidates must have strong interpersonal skills sufficient to inspire and work effectively with diverse groups of faculty, students, staff, alumni, and members of the bar. Preference will be given to applicants with scholarship, teaching, or practice expertise in criminal law and related fields.

Is this the position for you? See the full-post on PSJD.

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What Exactly Is a Split Summer?

By: Brittany Swett, J.D.

A new trend known as the “split summer” is gaining popularity among large law firms across the country. Despite the growing popularity of the split summer, a lot of law students and legal professionals have never heard of it. Today at PSJD, we are taking a quick look at what a split summer is and what some of the benefits and drawbacks are.

What a Split Summer Is:

Split summers come in a variety of forms. Most commonly, a split summer allows a law student who has secured a summer associate position for their 2L summer to spend the first half of the summer working at a law firm and the second half of the summer working for a nonprofit organization. Under this basic model, the law firm will then continue to pay the salary of the summer associate during the second half of the summer while they are at a non-profit. Some firms have taken this basic idea and added their own twist. Firms may require that the summer associate remain at the law firm for more than half of the summer and spend less time at the non-profit. Others have specific requirements about the non-profit chosen by the summer associate, while still others will only pay the summer associate for the time spent working at the firm. Each program is unique, but overall there are benefits and drawbacks to consider regarding a summer split.

Benefits to Splitting Your Summer:

Splitting a summer allows for a law student who is torn between the private sector and non-profit world to explore careers in both. The law student still gets to complete a summer associateship and enjoy all the benefits that come along with doing so, such as writing experience, the salary, professional contacts, and a potential offer at the end of the summer. In addition, the student gets to explore the non-profit sector, potentially working more closely with the public and for a cause they feel passionately about. In addition, if the student is someone who likes new experiences, two jobs in a short time span will keep them on their toes. Split summers also allow for a student to make a larger number of professional contacts in both fields. In addition, some split summer programs allow for their summer associates to work in two different cities over the course of the summer.

Drawbacks to Splitting Your Summer:

While eight or ten weeks can sound like a long time, it will fly by. One potential drawback of a split summer could be that the student is spreading themselves too thin. It may be more difficult to gain all the benefits of the experience at a law firm or at a non-profit organization if the student only spends a short time at each. In addition, forming meaningful professional connections with employees at each place may be more difficult due to the shortened length of time. Additionally, some law firms will give summer associates the time off to work at a non-profit, but will not compensate the summer associate for this time. Finally, the non-profit law world is also becoming more competitive in terms of job placement after graduation. If a law student knows that this is the field that they ultimately want to go into, spending a full summer at an organization ultimately may be more beneficial.

The split summer is an interesting new trend definitely worth exploring. To further research specific split summer programs, visit PSJD’s resource guide.

Sources:

https://law.yale.edu/student-life/career-development/students/career-guides-advice/what-are-firm-sponsored-split-public-interest-summers

http://hls.harvard.edu/content/uploads/2008/06/pi-summers.pdf

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Fellow Field Trip! – USPTO

By: Delisa Morris, Esq., M.S.

Last week I, Delisa Morris, former PSJD Fellow, had the opportunity to visit the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for educational programming about the office, and its internship and job opportunities. The audience got to hear from six offices inside the USPTO: Office of the Chief Communications Officer (OCCO), Office of Equal Employment and Opportunity and Diversity (OEEOD), Trademarks, Office of Human Resources (HR), Office of the Chief Economist (OCE) / Office of Policy and International Affairs (OPIA) and Patents. Each office representative shared a little about what she does day-to-day, the initiatives the office is pursuing, the type of jobs the office has and what hiring managers in each office look for in applicants.

The USPTO was listed as the Best Place to Work in Government in December 2013.  The agency is self-supported, which allows it to be insulated from government shutdowns.  Additionally, the USPTO allows for alternate work schedules and full-time work from home capabilities. Sounds like a great agency to start a career right?  It’s also a great place to work for the long haul!  Many of the presenters commented that they had been with the agency for decades.  They contribute their longevity with the USPTO on their ability to do ‘Details’ (a stint with another office or agency entirely for a period of time).  Some Details have lasted for years.

Below, I’ve pulled out a few key facts from what I learned about the USPTO.

Patents

  • There are 9,000 patent examiners (electrical, mechanical and physics)
  • 35 to 40% of the people who apply to become patent examiners receive full-time offers and 50% of those are JD holders
  • Fall externships are open now
  • There are opportunities to shadow employees on a case by case basis

OCCO

  • Always searching for strong writers
  • Accepting interns, but no full-time opportunities upcoming
  • Interns get ‘a run at the salad bar’
  • Hiring officials look favorably at applicants who were previously interns

OEEOD

  • Helps make USPTO diverse
  • 18 staff members (Directors are attorneys)
  • The formal team has three attorneys
  • The hiring manager is looking for:
    • Passion for EEO & Diversity and Inclusion
    • Prior education/internships in the area
    • work with affinity groups (i.e. NAACP)
    • solid writing skills
    • proven use of alternative dispute resolution skills
  • No internship program currently

Trademarks

  • Attorneys are the bulk of the workforce. 860 employees, 555 attorneys
  • 1,000 applicants per 50 jobs
  • The hiring manager is looking for:
    • Detail oriented and decisive
    • Works well independently, most of the time it will be just you and your computer
    • Soft skills: staying abreast of pop culture/current news, well rounded knowledge from art to sports to history
  • 80 attorneys telework across the USA and Puerto Rico
  • Legal internships (paid and unpaid) are available, and they are very competitive

HR

  • Wants the USPTO to be considered the Google of Government
  • Using storytelling to reach applicants starting with a new campaign #ChooseGov
  • 19% of recent grads are looking for government jobs, 74% of those seeking a government job are looking for work with the federal government
  • They understand the USAJobs is a tough system to work with, but working at the USPTO is wonderful and worth the application process
  • Veteran Hiring Program
    • Visit veteran recruitment fairs
    • Disabled veterans >30% are referred up to GS-15
    • Veterans with campaign medals are referred up to GS-11
    • Use the ‘Hire Vets’ mailbox to be matched before a position is broadcast to the public
      • Send an email to the veteran hiring coordinator and ask what’s available and if you qualify
      • Go through Recruit Military or Hiring Out Heroes

OCE/OPIA

  • A 2010 startup
  • Works on European trademarks, economic & legal literature updates
  • Trademark registration is a leading indicator of economic ups and downs (The base of IP is econ)
  • Hiring manager is looking for:
    • PhD’s
    • Open to different communication styles
    • Team oriented
  • Office has unpaid externs that work on specific programming projects

Bonus: The cafeteria at the USPTO is amazing! I had a delicious made-to-order salad from the manifold of food stations including a pop-up BBQ.

Thank you Tanaga Boozer for giving us an inside look at your great agency!

 

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Job’o’th’Week (Entry-Level Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

Attorney I: City of Arlington Attorney’s Office 

The Organization: 

The City Attorney provides legal counsel and advice to the Mayor, City Council, and all departments of the City of Arlington. The City Attorney prosecutes all actions in the Municipal Court; represents the City in litigation, and is responsible for drafting and preparing contracts, resolutions and ordinances.

The Position:

This position is responsible for performing legal research; drafting legal opinions, legal memoranda, and other legal documents; advising city employees and officials regarding city legal matters; investigating claims and complaints made against the City; representing the City in legal proceedings; and in some instances, prosecuting violators of City ordinances.

Know you would be a stellar fit for the position? See the full post on PSJD.

 

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The 2017- 2018 Comprehensive Fellowship Guide is live!

Fellowship Guide word cloud

The 2017-2018 Comprehensive Fellowship Guide is now available on PSJD. The Guide is your first stop in the search for post-graduate fellowships. An exclusively online Guide allows you to search in real time for the most current information. The Guide provides a portal to the database, which features over 300 fellowship opportunities. The database is continually updated, and we make every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in the Guide. PSJD also provides tips on applying for fellowships as well as a primer you can pass directly to students, including how to search by fellowship type, geographic location, or deadline. Check it out now; many fellowship application deadlines are quickly approaching.

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Job’o’th’Week (Fellowship Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

NYC Social Justice Post-Graduate Fellowship

The Organization

The Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) ensures that City agencies have the critical resources and support needed to provide the best possible services to the public.

The Position

Fellows will be placed within City agencies, offices, or the City Council in roles that complement their skill sets, interests, and expertise. The work will be legal in nature. Fellows will work on projects that foster equity for under served and under resourced communities, and engage in issue areas that impact communities that experience disparate outcomes across the five boroughs. In this capacity, Fellows will have the opportunity to collaborate with senior level policymakers, elected officials, and participate directly in the work of policy making and governance.

Ready to embark on your social justice crusade? See the full-post on PSJD.

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Job’o’th’Week (Fellowship Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

2018 – 2019 Law Fellow 

The Organization

The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) is one of the nation’s leading progressive legal organizations. Founded in 2001, ACS is comprised of law students, lawyers, scholars, judges, policymakers, activists and other concerned individuals who are working to ensure that the fundamental principles of human dignity, individual rights and liberties, genuine equality, and access to justice are in their rightful, central place in American law.

The Position

The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) seeks a talented graduating 3L or recent law school graduate to fill a position in ACS’s national headquarters. The Fellowship will begin in September 2018 and end in August 2019. The Fellow will serve as part of ACS’s Department of Policy Development and Programming staff, which is led by a group of experienced attorneys who coordinate and facilitate ACS’s rapidly expanding output of innovative, highly relevant legal and public policy work. He or she will work with the Department staff to engage scholars, practitioners, public officials, and law students in the articulation and dissemination of a progressive vision of the Constitution, law, and public policy.

Is this your dream opportunity?  See the full-post on PSJD.

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Job’o’th’Week (Entry-Level Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

Assistant Attorney General 

The Organization

The Attorney General of the State of Wyoming is appointed by the Governor, pursuant to Wyo.Stat. § 9-1-601 . The primary duties of the Attorney General are outlined in Wyo.Stat. § 9-1-603. The Attorney General’s office, by law, provides legal opinions only to elected and appointed state officials and represents the state agencies in actions in courts of law. The Attorney General’s office is prohibited from offering legal advice to private citizens or organizations.

The Position

The Wyoming Attorney General’s office seeks an attorney to represent the State of Wyoming in natural resources litigation in the Water & Natural Resources Division. The natural resources cases handled by this position are brought at the direction of the Governor, and the majority of these cases involve litigation either challenging or supporting actions taken by federal agencies on a diverse array of resource, energy, and environmental issues. Relevant statutes include the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Water Act, the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the National Forest Management Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.

Ready to protect the planet in Wyoming?  See the post on PSJD.

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Job’o’th’Week (Internship Edition)

Help Wanted

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

Legal Intern

The Organization

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) seeks experienced second- or third-year law students or LLM students with a strong commitment to social justice to provide legal research and analysis as part of a semester-long unpaid internship or externship opportunity. CCR is a national not-for-profit legal, educational, and advocacy organization dedicated to advancing and protecting the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Founded in 1966 by attorneys who represented civil rights movements in the South, CCR is committed to the creative use of law as a positive force for social change.

The Position

Interns will have the opportunity to work with CCR attorneys on a range of projects. Work with the International Human Rights docket is related to corporate accountability, torture, detention, suppression of dissent, anti-militarism, and violations under the Alien Tort Statute, the Torture Victim Protection Act, and universal jurisdiction. Some of our cases include: Challenge to abuse by private military contractors at Abu GhraibATS case in support of LGBTQI Ugandan organizersdefense of activists advocating for Palestinian human rightsadvocacy and litigation in foreign jurisdictions and international bodies in support of accountability and reparations for the Iraq War; FOIA litigation seeking information about the U.S. role in the attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and the coup in Honduras; and human rights advocacy to challenge Catholic Church cover-up of sexual violence by priests.

Ready to conquer constitutional cases?  Check out the full-post on PSJD.

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