Job’o’th’Week (Internship Edition)

The Program

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

Access to Justice (ATJ) Tech Fellows was created to provide future lawyers with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes they will need to be successful civil justice leaders. To achieve its goals, ATJ Tech Fellows implements an internship program that connects students with participating host organizations and provides a $5,000 stipend to cover summer expenses.

The program begins with Fellows diving into a skills-training bootcamp where they will be engrossed in live training modules for two days. Then fellows will apply their newly acquired skills in their 10-week, full-time internships with participating host organizations. Fellows will also have opportunities for professional development and to contribute their summer experiences to a blog for all Fellows.

Ideal candidates will be passionate about ensuring legal access and eager to learn about the ways legal technology can enhance resources available to low-income individuals and communities.

Students can learn more about which organizations will host ATJ Tech Fellows this summer on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/search?SearchTypeID=jobs&OrgID=112177

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Pro Bono Publico Award Finalists

At the October Mini-Conference, we announced the finalists for this year’s PSJD Pro Bono Publico Award. To commend each finalist on their hard work and to demonstrate how difficult it will be to select the winner, we will feature a different finalist on the blog every Monday for five weeks.

This week we feature Chelsea Reese from the University of Georgia School of Law in Athens, Georgia.

Chelsea Reese

University of Georgia Logo

Chelsea was selected as a finalist because of her compassionate commitment to children and victims of domestic violence. During her 1L year, Chelsea began working as a Court Appointed Special Advocate with Athens-Oconee CASA, where she not only produced quality work product, but also showed her supervisors her passion for ensuring children in temporary foster care receive the best possible outcomes. Chelsea grew attached to a pair of siblings and her dedication to these children has led her to follow their case with CASA and encouraged her to help as many children and families as she can. At school, Chelsea participated in UGA’s Family Justice Clinic where she provided sole representation for 10 clients and served over 600 hours. Chelsea’s devotion to family law and her exceptional work allowed her to become a teaching assistant with the Family Justice Clinic’s clinical professor for whom she supervised students’ work and addressed clients’ concerns. Alongside her clinical professor, Chelsea was also able to publish an article in the Georgia Law Review Online about the factors that cause women and children of color to become overrepresented in cases involving domestic violence. Chelsea has successfully served her community and her school as an advocate, a role model, a leader in pro bono service, and as her clinical professor describes Chelsea, someone who cares.

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Job’o’th’Week (Internship Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) is a nonprofit organization serving the LGBTQ community in the New England area. Their mission is to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation. GLAD staff achieve their mission through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and public education. Because discrimination against LGBTQ people and individuals living with HIV is prevalent in almost all areas of the law, GLAD works in every area to achieve full equality under the law.

The Position

GLAD seeks legal interns! Interested students can apply for term-time or summer internships. Legal interns will assist with active litigation, legislative and public policy advocacy, and public education initiatives.

Ideal candidates will have completed their first year of law school and have excellent research and writing skills. Most importantly, ideal candidates will be dedicated to achieving GLAD’s mission.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/job?OppID=99560

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Pro Bono Publico Award Finalists

At the October Mini-Conference, we announced the finalists for this year’s PSJD Pro Bono Publico Award. To commend each finalist on their hard work and to demonstrate how difficult it will be to select the winner, we will feature a different finalist on the blog every Monday for five weeks.

This week we feature Emily Holland from Pepperdine University School of Law in Malibu, California.

Emily Holland

Logo reproduced with permission

Emily was chosen as a finalist because of the strength of her dedication to pro bono service, which has taken her overseas to help ensure individuals’ rights are protected. Emily’s passion for volunteering began before law school, and her experiences have driven her to continue her work at Pepperdine. During her 1L summer, Emily worked as a judicial extern to the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Rwanda, where she learned about the ethics of sentencing and criminal justice. She was able to apply what she learned on a week-long clinic in Uganda where she successfully negotiated a plea deal based on insufficient evidence. But Emily’s passion for service knows no borders as is evident by her participation in the Community Justice and Legal Aid Clinics at Pepperdine. Her work with these clinics allowed her to advocate for human rights and access to justice in international and domestic contexts. As her supervisors have stated, Emily’s “priority is people,” and she is described as “a true representation of the spirit of pro bono.”

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PSJD Public Interest News Digest – February 7, 2020

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public!

Major news this week includes regulatory changes concerning student loans, with a new MOU between the Department of Education and the CFPB, as well as a streamlined application process for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Additionally, the ABA received pushback about its proposal to encourage state bars to explore “new approaches” in the practice of law. And in the top story below, Mother Jones spoke with immigration judges and attorneys about the logistical challenges they face implementing the Trump administration’s “Migrant Protection Protocols”.

As always, these stories and more are in the links below.

See you around,

Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

  • Mother Jones published a piece examining the impact of the Trump administration’s “Migrant Protection Protocols” on immigration courts:

    According to immigration judge Ashley Tabaddor, who spoke to me in her capacity as union president of the National Association of Immigration Judges, MPP has constituted a fundamental change to the way courts are run. DHS, she says, is “creating a situation where they’re physically, logistically, and systematically creating all the obstacles and holding all the cards.” The MPP program has left the court powerless, “speeding up the process of dehumanizing the individuals who are before the court and deterring anyone from the right to seek protection” All this while the Department of Justice is trying to decertify Tabbador’s union—the only protection judges have, and the only avenue for speaking publicly about these issues—by claiming its members are managers and no longer eligible for union membership. Tabaddor says the extreme number of cases combined with the pressure to process them quickly is making it difficult for judges to balance the DOJ’s demands with their oath of office.

    Immigration attorneys in El Paso, San Antonio, and San Diego have told me they are disturbed by the courtroom disarray: the unanswered phones, unopened mail, and unprocessed filings. Some of their clients are showing up at border [sic] in the middle of the night only to find that their cases have been rescheduled. That’s not only unfair, one attorney told me, “it’s dangerous.” Central Americans who speak only indigenous languages are asked to navigate court proceedings with Spanish interpreters. One attorney in El Paso had an 800-page filing for an asylum case that she filed with plenty of time for the judge to review, but it didn’t make it to the judge in time.

  • In Olympia WA, “[s]tate lawmakers are crying foul after a series of Immigration Customs Enforcement arrests outside of the Grant County Courthouse in Ephrata and Adams County District Courthouse in Othello last year [and considering] House Bill 2567[, which] ultimately could put an end to ICE courthouse arrests.

Student Loans & Student Debt

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

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Job’o’th’Week (Entry-Level Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

The Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) is a regional nonprofit organization working to protect the South’s natural resources as well as the health and well-being of Southern people. Their work may center on the Southern region, but the impact of their advocacy and litigation efforts is nationwide. SELC’s programs focus on six areas: clean energy and air; water; forests; the coast and wetlands; transportation; land-use and communities; and wildlife and special places. SELC attorneys and staff work in all branches and all levels of government to ensure that environmental laws are strengthened and enforced, to hold government agencies accountable, and to prevent environmental abuses.

The Position

SELC seeks an associate attorney to begin this fall in their Charleston, SC office. This is a two-year term position with the option for a third year and is perfect for recent law graduates looking to jump-start their careers. The associate will gain invaluable experience litigating and advocating in state and federal courts and before regulatory agencies.

The ideal candidate will have litigation experience and a background in environmental law.

More info on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/job?OppID=99610

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Pro Bono Publico Award Finalists

At the October Mini-Conference, we announced the finalists for this year’s PSJD Pro Bono Publico Award. To commend each finalist on their hard work and to demonstrate how difficult it will be to select the winner, we will feature a different finalist on the blog every Monday for the next five weeks.

This week we feature Ashley De La Garza from St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio, Texas.

Logo reproduced with permission

Ashley De La Garza

We selected Ashley as a finalist because she has shown unending dedication to pro bono work and criminal justice reform since she began law school. Ashley saw a need in Texas for devoted public defense and jumped in wholeheartedly to provide her support and skills. Ashley has worked in two public defender offices and has participated in her school’s Criminal Justice Clinic and Wrongful Conviction Review Project as well as the ABA’s Death Penalty Representation Project. Moreover, Ashley’s passion for service has extended to frequent participation in St. Mary’s Pro Bono Program, an alternative spring break in Washington, D.C., and public interest student organizations. As a former supervisor describes, Ashley’s compassion and advocacy for indigent clients has led her to achieve “one of the most critical student successes [the supervisor] has witnessed.” Her service has been invaluable in practice but also in the promotion of social justice reform through the selection of her legal journal article for publication in The Scholar. Ashley’s commitment, professionalism, and positive attitude has led her to be described as a leader in pro bono work among her classmates and colleagues.

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PSJD Public Interest News Digest – January 31, 2020

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public!

In another down-to-the-wire week, stories on Immigration and Civil Access to Justice dominated. As always, these stories and more are in the links below.

See you around,

Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

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Job’o’th’Week (Experienced Edition)

The Organization

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (Institute) is an Oakland-based national non-profit organization that provides resources on domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, and other forms of gender-based violence in the Asian and Pacific Islander communities. Not only does the Institute act as a clearinghouse of information, but its staff also provides training, technical assistance, and policy analysis. All of the Institute’s work is done to promote a vision of gender democracy.

The Position

The Institute seeks a law graduate to act as a Program Coordinator of the Improving Language Access in the Courts project. The Coordinator will be asked to collaborate with senior staff and national partners to develop trainings, translation guidance tools, and an iconography resource guide that will address the needs of individuals with limited English proficiency in the legal process.

The ideal candidate will have experience with the development and management of complex projects and programs, knowledge of gender-based violence, and experience with legal professionals and judicial processes. Additionally, it is preferred that the candidate be bilingual or bi-literate in an Asian or Pacific islander language.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/job?OppID=98854

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Pro Bono Publico Award Finalists

At the October Mini-Conference, we announced the finalists for this year’s PSJD Pro Bono Publico Award. To commend each finalist on their hard work and to demonstrate how difficult it will be to select the winner, we will feature a different finalist on the blog every Monday for the next five weeks.

Starting at the beginning of the alphabet, our first finalist is Leslie Alvarez from St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio, Texas.

St. Mary's University: Center for Legal and Social Justice (logo)
Logo reproduced with permission

Leslie Alvarez

We selected Leslie as a finalist because her achievements in pro bono demonstrate a clear commitment to serving her community. Using her experiences as a first-generation U.S. citizen and with navigating the special education system, Leslie is a passionate advocate for disability rights. At work, she represented detained immigrant children with disabilities. Her supervisor describes Leslie as having “an unmatched work ethic” and “dedication to protecting the autonomy of people with disabilities.” At school, she coordinated two pro-bono legal clinics: one clinic to improve access to guardianship for individuals with disabilities, and another to “prepare psychiatric advance directives and other documents for individuals with mental health challenges.” Her tireless and compassionate efforts have made her an invaluable addition to the South Texas pro bono community. As Leslie herself asserts, “My current focus is on the disability rights fight, but my passion will always be service.”

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