PSJD Public Interest News Digest – January 17, 2020

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public!

Hope 2020 is treating everyone well so far. I’m reeling a bit from the onslaught of news, so this is our first Digest of the year. We’re off to a roaring start. The right to counsel in immigration and asylum cases saw major developments, with a federal judge in California affirming asylum seekers’ right to counsel while New York State legislators debated creating a statutory right to publicly-funded counsel in deportation cases. Student loans also continue to make headlines, with the House of Representatives repudiating Secretary DeVos’ new regulations concerning student loan forgiveness in situations of fraud and a bankruptcy judge in New York discharging a lawyer’s student loan debt. Criminal justice reform has also been a major topic, from Minnesota, where Attorney General Ellison called for an investigation into the summary firing of Hennepin County’s Chief Public Defender, to Missouri, where the St. Louis District Attorney filed a federal suit against the city and its police union under the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871. Oh! And former PSJD Fellow and Georgetown OPICS alum Katie Dilks was named the Executive Director of the Oklahoma Access to Justice Foundation. Congratulations Katie!

As always, these stories and more are in the links below.

See you around,

Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

Disaster Law & The Environment

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

Comments

Job’o’th’Week (Fellowship Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

Third Way is a national center-left think tank that believes in mainstream American values of opportunity, freedom, and security. Their work focuses on high-impact advocacy campaigns that combine policy research with an inclusive understanding of the American middle. The issues Third Way currently advocate for span topics of climate and energy, economics, education, health care, national security, politics, and social policy.

The Positions

Third Way seeks policy fellows to work in four areas: National Security, Economics, Social Policy and Politics, and Climate and Energy. These fellows will join dedicated and dynamic teams seeking to make real change in their advocacy focus-areas.

The ideal candidates will be able to work both independently and collaboratively, take initiative on projects, know how to explain complicated concepts in a clear and understandable way, and have strong research, analysis, and writing skills.

For more information about each opportunity, see Third Way’s profile on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/organizationdetails?OrgID=58309

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PSJD Public Interest News Digest – December 20, 2019



Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public! Hope the final days of this decade are treating you all well. Among the many retrospectives this week, you may find the one by Slate interesting, which describes the 2010’s as “The Decade Class Actions Were Gutted.” In the here-and-now, immigration and student loans stories continue to dominate, with a new federal lawsuit accusing the Trump administration of “weaponizing” the immigration court system and the Trump administration announcing its intention to take up student loan debt reform. 

In sunnier news, the right to counsel in eviction just received bipartisan federal attention in the Senate! As usual, these stories and more are in the links below.

See you around,
  Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

Comments

Job’o’th’Week (Entry-Level Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

A Heartland Alliance initiative, the National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) provides direct legal services to and advocates for the immigrant, asylum seeker, and refugee communities. The NIJC is dedicated to ensuring these communities have access to justice and human rights protections. NIJC accomplishes its goals through the hard work of dedicated staff and pro bono attorneys in Illinois, Indiana, and Washington, D.C. To date, the NIJC provides legal services to more than 10,000 individuals each year with a success rate of 90 percent in obtaining asylum for its clients.

The Position

The NIJC seeks a staff attorney for its LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative to provide representation to LGBTQ immigrants and asylum seekers as well as individuals living with HIV/AIDS. The attorney’s primary duties will involve conducting intake interviews, developing and implementing case strategies, representing individuals in hearings and interviews, maintaining professional relationships with relevant government agencies, social service organizations, and community organizations, and much more.

The ideal candidate will be able to remain calm in emotional situations; to communicate well in speech and in writing; to think analytically, creatively, and strategically; and to display passion and optimism in upholding NIJC’s mission.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/opportunitydetails?OppID=98232

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PSJD Public Interest News Digest – December 13, 2019

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public! Big news this week included revised plans for legal aid funding out of Ontario and a Department of Education decision not to issue full refunds to student debt-holders who were victims of fraud by for-profit colleges. You may also want to give the first article in the immigration section a look. I’d say more, but unfortunately I have to run.

See you around,

  Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

Legal Tchnology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

Comments

Job’o’th’Week (Internship Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

The New York State Office of the Attorney General (NY OAG) is both the “People’s Lawyer” and the State’s chief legal officer. The NY OAG not only guards the legal rights of New York citizens, but it also advises the State government and defends the State in proceedings. The NY OAG is charged with the statutory and common law powers to protect consumers and investors, charitable donors, the public health and environment, civil rights, and the rights of wage-earners and businesses across the State. The NY OAG also investigates organized crime and Medicaid fraud. The NY OAG is divided into five primary divisions: Appeals and Opinions, State Counsel, Criminal Justice, Economic Justice, and Social Justice. With over 650 Assistant Attorneys General and 1,700 employees, the NY OAG is one of the largest public interest law firms in the country.

The Position

The NY OAG seeks law students to participate in its full-time, paid summer internship program. Interested students may apply to specific divisions and regional offices for consideration. Students will assist in all phases of attorneys’ work, including legal research, court filings, discovery, and trial preparation.

The ideal candidates will have finished their first semesters of law school and demonstrate an interest in public service.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/opportunitydetails?OppID=97912

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PSJD Public Interest News Digest – December 6, 2019

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public! Hope everyone had a chance to relax over Thanksgiving, because we’ve got a lot of ground to cover in another two-week span of news.

There’s an upcoming law review article arguing there’s a generational gap in the approach public interest lawyers take to their work (that’s the Editor’s Pick this week). Additionally, major changes to immigration law are underway as DOJ published memos limiting service providers’ ability to assist unaccompanied migrant children and the Supreme Court granted cert. on a case in which the federal government appealed a circuit decision striking down a statute criminalizing activity that “encourages or induces an alien come to, enter, or reside in the United States, knowing or in reckless disregard of the fact that such [behavior] is or will be in violation of the law” as overbroad in violation of the First Amendment. Meanwhile, Secretary of Education DeVos proposed spinning off the Department of Education’s student loan portfolio into a separate federal agency, the Miami Herald reported a “staggering exodus” of underpaid government attorneys in their city, and the Deputy Attorney General of the United States wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post expressing alarm over the recent trend toward “progressive prosecution” among city District Attorneys.

As always, these stories and more are linked below.

See you around,

Sam

Editor’s Pick: Rise of a New Generation of Legal Advocates

TheCrimeReport.org previewed arguments from a forthcoming law review article that Professors Luz E. Herrer (Texas A&M) and Louise Trubek (U Wisconsin) will publish in the New York University Review of Law and Social Change:

“ ‘Critical lawyers are creating an architecture that leverages their expertise to help clients and communities advance their social justice missions,’ the authors said. Their practices differ from the traditional non-profit public interest firms of the earlier generation that assumed justice would result if there [sic] law and lawyers were accessible.

Should be an interesting read, when it comes out.

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

2020 Census

International Law

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

Comments

Job’o’th’Week (Experienced Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

Community Legal Services (CLS) is a civil legal aid organization dedicated to providing free legal assistance to low-income Philadelphians. CLS staff work in legal areas of debt and consumer protection, housing, family issues, employment, public benefits, criminal records, and elder issues. CLS services extend not only to individual representation and counseling, but also class action litigation, community education, and social services.

The Position

Community Legal Services seeks a staff attorney to aid low-income immigrant and Limited English Proficient communities. This position allows the attorney to become an expert in Language Access law through representation of clients and political advocacy. The attorney will be expected to create and implement Language Access Policies and Plans at public agencies, governments, and courts. The attorney will also have the opportunity to work in CLS’s various legal units to aid in the representation of immigrants and Limited English Proficient persons.

The ideal candidate will have experience in litigation, policy, and immigration. The ideal candidate will also have a passion for working with and representing low-income clients, particularly those who are Limited English Proficient or immigrants.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/opportunitydetails?OppID=97932

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Job’o’th’Week (Fellowship Edition)

Photo: Brenda Gottesman – CC License

The Organization

The International Human Rights Law Clinic (IHRLC) at Berkeley School of Law is one of the first of its kind. IHRLC designs and implements projects for the advancement of human rights and collaborates with researchers, scholars, and human rights activists worldwide. Clinic students currently work in four areas: Promoting Human Rights Within the U.S.; Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights; and Accountability and Transitional Justice. While working on these issues, students also participate in a seminar to bridge the gap between legal theory and practice.

The Position

The IHRLC seeks a Clinical Teaching Fellow to assist in the supervision and administration of the clinic. The Fellow will be responsible for assisting students in their work, teaching and planning at least one seminar, conducting human rights studies, and traveling with students for any case-related tasks.

The ideal candidate will have experience with and knowledge of international human rights issues and experience in clinical teaching.

See the full post on PSJD: https://www.psjd.org/opportunitydetails?OppID=97778

Comments

PSJD Public Interest News Digest – November 22, 2019

Sam Halpert, NALP Director of Public Service Initiatives

Photo: Harris and Ewing Collection, Library of Congress

Hello there, interested public! Playing catchup after last week and it’s a bumper crop of news stories for you all, so buckle in. Of particular note: the Washington State Attorney General’s office published a report based on interviews it has conducted with children in Washington formerly detained on the southern border, unionization drives at two major civil rights organizations have met with resistance from management, and California is considering first-in-the-nation enforceable borrower protections for student loan debtors.

As always, these stories and more are linked below.

See you around,

Sam

Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Issues

Student Loans & Student Debt

International Law

Legal Technology

Non-Profit & Government Management & Hiring

Access to Justice – Civil

Access to Justice – Criminal

Criminal Justice Reform

Comments